Nineteenth-Century French Poetry



Transpositions of Thought and Form in the
Nineteenth Century and Beyond


One-day colloquium to be held at Bangor University
Saturday 21 February 2009


Nineteenth-century French poetry has inspired writers and thinkers in a whole range of domains, affecting artistic and theoretical production not just in nineteenth-century France itself, but throughout the twentieth and twenty-first centuries and in countries beyond France. As the poetry of this period is transposed into different modes of thought and form that reach into our own century, a number of key questions arise:
-    What domains does nineteenth-century French poetry infiltrate and influence?
-    What does this mean for the status, or ‘life’, of poetry?
-    What are the extent and modifications of the poetic model?
-    Why is the influence so far-reaching?
This one-day event brings together over a dozen specialists in French Studies with various interests to address these questions, including Peter Dayan (University of Edinburgh), Susan Harrow (University of Bristol), and Richard Langham Smith (Royal College of Music). The colloquium will be divided into four sections, considering French poetry during and beyond this period from the following perspectives: Political; Visual; Ethical; and Musical.

Each speaker will deliver a working paper that will be followed by table ronde discussions to identify responses, overlaps, and tensions, as well as tease out further questions. The day will culminate with a musical soirée presented by the Bangor Artist in Residence, followed by a gala dinner. Following on from the workshop, the organisers will coordinate an email discussion list with subject threads derived from the agendas raised during the sessions to enable further dialogue. The subsequent findings will be edited into a 2010 book publication.

On behalf of the speakers, we warmly invite colleagues and graduate students with an interest in French poetry to participate as interlocutors. Registration details are available at www.bangor.ac.uk/ml. For further information, please contact the organisers:

Helen Abbott (h.abbott@bangor.ac.uk) Bradley Stephens (bradley.stephens@bristol.ac.uk)


 

Interpretation

Demeures de Baudelaire